Green Things

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Reblogged from thatscienceguy

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

(via thecraftychemist)

Reblogged from stephenrahn
stephenrahn:

Sunday Night Moon. 34% Illuminated. #moon #astronomy #astrophotography #canon #6d #tamron #space #universe #science #luna

stephenrahn:

Sunday Night Moon. 34% Illuminated. #moon #astronomy #astrophotography #canon #6d #tamron #space #universe #science #luna

(via astronemma)

Reblogged from thedragoninmygarage
Reblogged from conservationbiologist
conservationbiologist:

by Frans de Waal
LONELY WHALEIt has been tracked since 1992 and been labeled the loneliest whale in the world. It sings at a frequency of 51.75 Hz whereas others of it’s kind sing at 15 - 25 Hz. It does not travel along migration routes of any baleen whale species. There is no opportunity for other whales to run into it."The best guess of researchers is that this lonely whale is either a ‘deformed’ hybrid between 2 species of whale, or the last surviving member of an unknown species." - Impact Labhttp://factsnacks.blogspot.nl/2011/03/1-is-loneliest-number.html

conservationbiologist:

by Frans de Waal

LONELY WHALE

It has been tracked since 1992 and been labeled the loneliest whale in the world. It sings at a frequency of 51.75 Hz whereas others of it’s kind sing at 15 - 25 Hz. It does not travel along migration routes of any baleen whale species. There is no opportunity for other whales to run into it.

"The best guess of researchers is that this lonely whale is either a ‘deformed’ hybrid between 2 species of whale, or the last surviving member of an unknown species." - Impact Lab

http://factsnacks.blogspot.nl/2011/03/1-is-loneliest-number.html

Reblogged from fromquarkstoquasars
fromquarkstoquasars:

Scientists Find Vaccine That Completely Blocks HIV Infection in Monkeys

Human trials are planned and, If successful, this HIV vaccine could be taken as a probiotic-like drink.

Learn more about this potential vaccine at:http://bit.ly/1vxjL38

fromquarkstoquasars:

Scientists Find Vaccine That Completely Blocks HIV Infection in Monkeys

Human trials are planned and, If successful, this HIV vaccine could be taken as a probiotic-like drink.

Learn more about this potential vaccine at:
http://bit.ly/1vxjL38

Reblogged from probablyasocialecologist
We have grown up on this planet, trapped, in a certain sense, on it, not knowing of the existence of anything else beyond our immediate surroundings, having to figure the world out for ourselves. What a courageous and difficult enterprise, building, generation after generation, on what has been learned in the past; questioning the conventional wisdom; being willing, sometimes at great personal risk, to challenge the prevailing wisdom and gradually, slowly emerging from this torment, a well-based, in many senses predictive, quantitative understanding of the nature of the world around us. Not, by any means, understanding every aspect of that world but gradually, through successive approximations, understanding more and more. We face a difficult and uncertain future, and it seems to me it requires all of those talents that have been honed by our evolution and our history, if we are to survive. Carl SaganThe Varieties of Scientific Experience  (via scinerds)

(Source: probablyasocialecologist, via sagansense)

Reblogged from rrosejonathanselavy
There are accepted revolutions, revolutions which are called revolutions; there are refused revolutions, which are called riots. Les Miserables Volume 5, Book 1, Chapter 20 (via rrosejonathanselavy)

(via failure-is-an-option)

Reblogged from micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”

It’s fairly simpleFollow micdotcom

(via failure-is-an-option)

Reblogged from emotioncaptured
Reblogged from science-and-logic

You see, when a hagfish is threatened, it often slimes predators—and within that slime are tiny filaments that are 100 times thinner than a human hair, yet stronger than nylon and kevlar.

Its filaments have many of the same properties as spider silk, but, genetically, it’s much simpler. That made it that much easier for a synthetic biology startup in Ireland to bioengineer e. coli into making the filaments within the slime, no hagfish required.

DNA From This Ugly Fish Is Being Used to Synthesize Bulletproof Slime | Motherboard (via science-and-logic)

(via science-and-logic)

Reblogged from child-of-thecosmos
child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

(via sagansense)

Reblogged from wildcat2030
Reblogged from neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

'Haven't my neurons seen this before?'
The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. The study is published online by Nature Neuroscience.
The CNBC researchers showed animal subjects a rapid succession of images, some that were new, and some that the subjects had seen more than 100 times. The researchers measured the electrical response of individual neurons in the inferotemporal cortex, an essential part of the visual system and the part of the brain responsible for object recognition.
In previous studies, researchers found that when subjects were shown a single, familiar image, their neurons responded less strongly than when they were shown an unfamiliar image. However, in the current study, the CNBC researchers found that when subjects were exposed to familiar and unfamiliar images in a rapid succession, their neurons — especially the inhibitory neurons — fired much more strongly and selectively to images the subject had seen many times before.
"It was such a dramatic effect, it leapt out at us," said Carl Olson, a professor at Carnegie Mellon. "You wouldn’t expect there to be such deep changes in the brain from simply making things familiar. We think this may be a mechanism the brain uses to track a rapidly changing visual environment."
The researchers then ran a similar experiment in which they used themselves as subjects, recording their brain activity using EEG. They found that the humans’ brains responded similarly to the animal subjects’ brains when presented with familiar or unfamiliar images in rapid succession. In future studies, they hope to link these changes in the brain to improvements in perception and cognition.

neurosciencestuff:

'Haven't my neurons seen this before?'

The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. The study is published online by Nature Neuroscience.

The CNBC researchers showed animal subjects a rapid succession of images, some that were new, and some that the subjects had seen more than 100 times. The researchers measured the electrical response of individual neurons in the inferotemporal cortex, an essential part of the visual system and the part of the brain responsible for object recognition.

In previous studies, researchers found that when subjects were shown a single, familiar image, their neurons responded less strongly than when they were shown an unfamiliar image. However, in the current study, the CNBC researchers found that when subjects were exposed to familiar and unfamiliar images in a rapid succession, their neurons — especially the inhibitory neurons — fired much more strongly and selectively to images the subject had seen many times before.

"It was such a dramatic effect, it leapt out at us," said Carl Olson, a professor at Carnegie Mellon. "You wouldn’t expect there to be such deep changes in the brain from simply making things familiar. We think this may be a mechanism the brain uses to track a rapidly changing visual environment."

The researchers then ran a similar experiment in which they used themselves as subjects, recording their brain activity using EEG. They found that the humans’ brains responded similarly to the animal subjects’ brains when presented with familiar or unfamiliar images in rapid succession. In future studies, they hope to link these changes in the brain to improvements in perception and cognition.

Reblogged from afro-dominicano
Reblogged from thedragoninmygarage