Green Things

Life's a garden. Dig it.


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from rachelswhirlwind
rachelswhirlwind:

Some days all I do is watch The Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson in my underwear and ask too many questions about the universe.

rachelswhirlwind:

Some days all I do is watch The Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson in my underwear and ask too many questions about the universe.

(via startalkradio)

Reblogged from wakinglithiumflower
For each person there is a sentence -a series of words- which has the power to destroy them. Philip K. Dick (via wakinglithiumflower)
Reblogged from currentsinbiology
jtotheizzoe:

currentsinbiology:


These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack
There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.
A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

Hey look, it’s an article I wrote for WIRED last year popping up on my own dashboard! Circle of life, man.

jtotheizzoe:

currentsinbiology:

These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack

There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.

A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

Hey look, it’s an article I wrote for WIRED last year popping up on my own dashboard! Circle of life, man.

(via popmech)

Reblogged from nprfreshair

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.

Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

(via npr)

Reblogged from likeafieldmouse
Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old nonsense. This day is all that is good and fair. It is too dear, with its hopes and invitations, to waste a moment on yesterdays. Ralph Waldo Emerson (via likeafieldmouse)

(via failure-is-an-option)

Reblogged from orandagirl
orandagirl:

Mushroom walk! #fungi #fall #fairy #apartments (at Tomorrow River)

orandagirl:

Mushroom walk! #fungi #fall #fairy #apartments (at Tomorrow River)

(via mycology)

Reblogged from neuromorphogenesis
Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained. Marie Curie (via neuromorphogenesis)

(via neuromorphogenesis)

Reblogged from neuromorphogenesis
neuromorphogenesis:

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom
If you want to make a neuroscientist’s head explode, all you need to do is confidently and triumphantly tell them that humans only use 10% of their brains. Or that right-brained people are more creative than left-brained people. Or that jiggling your head around gets more blood to the brain so you can think more efficiently. These are myths about the brain that have now been around for so long, it’s a wonder they haven’t had a congratulatory message from the Queen.
Unfortunately, because they’ve been around for so long, neuromyths have taken hold in a broad range of aspects of everyday life. Nowhere is this more problematic than in the education system. A new article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience this week has cast a critical eye on the issue, and reveals some worrying statistics about the extent to which brain baloney have infiltrated the beliefs of teachers around the world.
The survey, conducted by Paul Howard-Jones at the University of Bristol, asked 938 teachers from five different countries whether they agreed or not with a number of statements relating to popular myths about the brain. The results paint a picture of a global epidemic of neurononsense. In the UK, 91% of teachers surveyed believed that differences in hemispheric dominance could account for differences in preferred learning methods for students – in other words, ‘left-brained’ students think in a different way to ‘right-brained’ students. Among Chinese teachers, 59% agreed that we only use 10% of our brains. Across all five countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Turkey, Greece and China – on average, a whopping 96% of surveyed teachers agreed that students learn most effectively when taught in their preferred learning style (visual, auditory or kinaesthetic).
But why is this the case? Howard-Jones argues that there’s a number of reasons why neuromyths persist, but they essentially all boil down to inadequate communication between neuroscientists, educators and policymakers.
In particular, an ongoing issue is that neuroscientific counter-evidence to dodgy brain claims are difficult to access for non-specialists. Often, crucial information appears in quite a complex form in specialist neuroscientific journals, and often behind an exorbitant paywall – for example, the Journal of Neuroscience charges $30 for one day of access to a single article. And yes, ironically it’s worth noting that the neuromyths paper is, frustratingly, also behind a paywall.
Another problem is misinterpretation – particularly when it comes to neuroimaging studies. Without a proper grounding in how to interpret scans of the brain, images showing different areas ‘lighting up’ perpetuates a misconception that these areas are active but isolated from each other, with the rest of the brain inactive at that point in time. “To non specialists”, Howard-Jones argues in the paper, “apparently well-defined and static islands on one side of a brain are more suggested of a new phrenology than of a statistical map indicating where activity has exceeded an arbitrary threshold.”
And so we’re left with a situation in which neuromyths have largely been left unchallenged in the education system. But, at least there’s a spark of hope that this is changing. Both teachers and neuroscientists alike are starting to see an increased need for better communication. A new field of ‘educational neuroscience’ is starting to develop, in part bolstered by a 2011 report from the Royal Society looking at some of the implications of neuroscience within a teaching and learning setting. And teaching unions are eager to look at the possibilities for using neuroscience – they just need to be careful that they do so in an objective, evidence-based way.
Two things spring to mind that can be done immediately. Wouldn’t it be great if Nature Reviews Neuroscience dropped the paywall for this article, and sent it to as many teachers and schools as possible? Alternatively, let’s give teachers a core textbook of their own: Christian Jarrett’s excellent book Great Myths of the Brain, which came out this week. Required reading before thinking about neuroscience-based education policies. And yes, it will be on the exam at the end of the year.
By the way, if you want to make a psychologist’s head explode, all you need to do is ask them if they can tell what you’re thinking. Or ask them whether it’s a proper science. Just don’t mention anything about p values or replication.

neuromorphogenesis:

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom

If you want to make a neuroscientist’s head explode, all you need to do is confidently and triumphantly tell them that humans only use 10% of their brains. Or that right-brained people are more creative than left-brained people. Or that jiggling your head around gets more blood to the brain so you can think more efficiently. These are myths about the brain that have now been around for so long, it’s a wonder they haven’t had a congratulatory message from the Queen.

Unfortunately, because they’ve been around for so long, neuromyths have taken hold in a broad range of aspects of everyday life. Nowhere is this more problematic than in the education system. A new article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience this week has cast a critical eye on the issue, and reveals some worrying statistics about the extent to which brain baloney have infiltrated the beliefs of teachers around the world.

The survey, conducted by Paul Howard-Jones at the University of Bristol, asked 938 teachers from five different countries whether they agreed or not with a number of statements relating to popular myths about the brain. The results paint a picture of a global epidemic of neurononsense. In the UK, 91% of teachers surveyed believed that differences in hemispheric dominance could account for differences in preferred learning methods for students – in other words, ‘left-brained’ students think in a different way to ‘right-brained’ students. Among Chinese teachers, 59% agreed that we only use 10% of our brains. Across all five countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Turkey, Greece and China – on average, a whopping 96% of surveyed teachers agreed that students learn most effectively when taught in their preferred learning style (visual, auditory or kinaesthetic).

But why is this the case? Howard-Jones argues that there’s a number of reasons why neuromyths persist, but they essentially all boil down to inadequate communication between neuroscientists, educators and policymakers.

In particular, an ongoing issue is that neuroscientific counter-evidence to dodgy brain claims are difficult to access for non-specialists. Often, crucial information appears in quite a complex form in specialist neuroscientific journals, and often behind an exorbitant paywall – for example, the Journal of Neuroscience charges $30 for one day of access to a single article. And yes, ironically it’s worth noting that the neuromyths paper is, frustratingly, also behind a paywall.

Another problem is misinterpretation – particularly when it comes to neuroimaging studies. Without a proper grounding in how to interpret scans of the brain, images showing different areas ‘lighting up’ perpetuates a misconception that these areas are active but isolated from each other, with the rest of the brain inactive at that point in time. “To non specialists”, Howard-Jones argues in the paper, “apparently well-defined and static islands on one side of a brain are more suggested of a new phrenology than of a statistical map indicating where activity has exceeded an arbitrary threshold.”

And so we’re left with a situation in which neuromyths have largely been left unchallenged in the education system. But, at least there’s a spark of hope that this is changing. Both teachers and neuroscientists alike are starting to see an increased need for better communication. A new field of ‘educational neuroscience’ is starting to develop, in part bolstered by a 2011 report from the Royal Society looking at some of the implications of neuroscience within a teaching and learning setting. And teaching unions are eager to look at the possibilities for using neuroscience – they just need to be careful that they do so in an objective, evidence-based way.

Two things spring to mind that can be done immediately. Wouldn’t it be great if Nature Reviews Neuroscience dropped the paywall for this article, and sent it to as many teachers and schools as possible? Alternatively, let’s give teachers a core textbook of their own: Christian Jarrett’s excellent book Great Myths of the Brain, which came out this week. Required reading before thinking about neuroscience-based education policies. And yes, it will be on the exam at the end of the year.

By the way, if you want to make a psychologist’s head explode, all you need to do is ask them if they can tell what you’re thinking. Or ask them whether it’s a proper science. Just don’t mention anything about p values or replication.

(via psycholar)

Reblogged from rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Mythical Medicinal Mushroom Found Only in Old Growth Forest
by Kimberly Mok
Fungi are incredible organisms that are vital to the earth’s ecosystems. They assist in the bioremediation of poisoned soils and oceans, and are also a source of food, and even building material for us humans.
Some, like American mycologist and founder of Fungi Perfecti, Paul Stamets, have famously asserted that fungi will save the world — no off-hand statement, coming from a man who has spent his life studying and promoting fungi and the end of “fungi-phobia” worldwide.
Historically, a wide range of mushrooms have been used in medicine, and there may be one mushroom that might hold the key to the future of medicine. For years, Stamets has been on the look-out for the agarikon (Fomitopsis officinalis or Laricifomes officinalis, depending on the tree it grows on), a rare and endangered mushroom that grows only in old-growth conifer forests of North America and Europe…
(read more: TreeHugger)
photograph by Dusty Yao

rhamphotheca:

Mythical Medicinal Mushroom Found Only in Old Growth Forest

by Kimberly Mok

Fungi are incredible organisms that are vital to the earth’s ecosystems. They assist in the bioremediation of poisoned soils and oceans, and are also a source of food, and even building material for us humans.

Some, like American mycologist and founder of Fungi Perfecti, Paul Stamets, have famously asserted that fungi will save the world — no off-hand statement, coming from a man who has spent his life studying and promoting fungi and the end of “fungi-phobia” worldwide.

Historically, a wide range of mushrooms have been used in medicine, and there may be one mushroom that might hold the key to the future of medicine. For years, Stamets has been on the look-out for the agarikon (Fomitopsis officinalis or Laricifomes officinalis, depending on the tree it grows on), a rare and endangered mushroom that grows only in old-growth conifer forests of North America and Europe…

(read more: TreeHugger)

photograph by Dusty Yao

Reblogged from questionall
biodiverseed:

I was very lucky to have horticulture as an elective in my high school. If I hadn’t had that trade course, I probably wouldn’t have ended up being employed in a greenhouse after school, and thus really getting into gardening in my late teens.
If I had discovered this passion even earlier, I probably wouldn’t have ended up with a useless anthropology degree!
I can’t imagine my life without horticulture now.
#health

biodiverseed:

I was very lucky to have horticulture as an elective in my high school. If I hadn’t had that trade course, I probably wouldn’t have ended up being employed in a greenhouse after school, and thus really getting into gardening in my late teens.

If I had discovered this passion even earlier, I probably wouldn’t have ended up with a useless anthropology degree!

I can’t imagine my life without horticulture now.

#health

(Source: questionall, via fuckyeahplantae)

Reblogged from archivesfoundation
archivesfoundation:

On October 12, 1928, the negative pressure ventilator, commonly known as the iron lung, was used clinically for the first time at Boston Children’s Hospital.
The iron lung is a device designed to assist with the breathing those who have either lost control of their diaphragm muscles or whose muscles don’t have the strength to breathe. It does this by creating an airtight seal around the body of a patient and then periodically increasing and decreasing the pressure exerted on their chest, thus moving their diaphragm for them and allowing them to breathe. 
Image: “Photograph of Nurses Being Instructed on the Use of Respirator for a Polio Patient," undated

archivesfoundation:

On October 12, 1928, the negative pressure ventilator, commonly known as the iron lung, was used clinically for the first time at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The iron lung is a device designed to assist with the breathing those who have either lost control of their diaphragm muscles or whose muscles don’t have the strength to breathe. It does this by creating an airtight seal around the body of a patient and then periodically increasing and decreasing the pressure exerted on their chest, thus moving their diaphragm for them and allowing them to breathe. 

Image: “Photograph of Nurses Being Instructed on the Use of Respirator for a Polio Patient," undated

(via corporisfabrica)

Reblogged from im-afraid-i-cant-do-that
Reblogged from nightcheeseandwaffles

nightcheeseandwaffles:

what’s d/dx of amazon?

amazon prime

(via chroniclesofachemist)

Reblogged from biocanvas
biocanvas:

Human immunodeficiency virus
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, in yellow) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In patients with AIDS, specific immune cells (such as T cells, in blue) die as the virus hijacks normal cellular machinery in order to replicate in vast numbers. Without proper immune function, patients become susceptible to otherwise innocuous infections that the body can no longer fight off. Recent research has turned to powerful computer systems to decrease the time it takes to find new HIV drugs from several years to just weeks, tremendously accelerating the drug discovery process.
Image by Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer, and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health.

biocanvas:

Human immunodeficiency virus

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, in yellow) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In patients with AIDS, specific immune cells (such as T cells, in blue) die as the virus hijacks normal cellular machinery in order to replicate in vast numbers. Without proper immune function, patients become susceptible to otherwise innocuous infections that the body can no longer fight off. Recent research has turned to powerful computer systems to decrease the time it takes to find new HIV drugs from several years to just weeks, tremendously accelerating the drug discovery process.

Image by Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer, and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health.

Reblogged from dynamicoceans
dynamicoceans:

This little crab is a porcelain anemone crab
They prefer to spend time in the tentacles of anemones, sifting small particles of food from the passing water. Just like clown fish, they are immune to the anemone sting and seek protection within them. 
Video

dynamicoceans:

This little crab is a porcelain anemone crab

They prefer to spend time in the tentacles of anemones, sifting small particles of food from the passing water. Just like clown fish, they are immune to the anemone sting and seek protection within them. 

Video