Green Things

Life's a garden. Dig it.


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Reblogged from wildcat2030
Nature has employed at least two very different ways of making a brain—indeed, there are almost as many ways as there are phyla in the animal kingdom. Mind, to varying degrees, has arisen or is embodied in all of these, despite the profound biological gulf that separates them from one other, and us from them. The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others by Oliver Sacks | The New York Review of Books (via wildcat2030)

(via sagansense)

Reblogged from laboratoryequipment
melodiebenford:

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Uncovers ‘Quantum Droplet’ in SemiconductorJILA physicists used an ultrafast laser and help from German theorists to discover a new semiconductor quasiparticle — a handful of smaller particles that briefly condense into a liquid-like droplet.Quasiparticles are composites of smaller particles that can be created inside solid materials and act together in a predictable way. A simple example is the exciton, a pairing, due to electrostatic forces, of an electron and a so-called “hole,” a place in the material’s energy structure where an electron could be, but isn’t.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/laser-uncovers-%E2%80%98quantum-droplet%E2%80%99-semiconductor

I love me a good, ole quasi-particle!

melodiebenford:

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Uncovers ‘Quantum Droplet’ in Semiconductor

JILA physicists used an ultrafast laser and help from German theorists to discover a new semiconductor quasiparticle — a handful of smaller particles that briefly condense into a liquid-like droplet.

Quasiparticles are composites of smaller particles that can be created inside solid materials and act together in a predictable way. A simple example is the exciton, a pairing, due to electrostatic forces, of an electron and a so-called “hole,” a place in the material’s energy structure where an electron could be, but isn’t.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/laser-uncovers-%E2%80%98quantum-droplet%E2%80%99-semiconductor

I love me a good, ole quasi-particle!

(via cosmo-nautic)

Reblogged from neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

Research sheds new light on impact of diabetes on the brain
The new findings published in the Diabetes Care journal reveal the extent of damage patients suffering with the disease can endure in areas of the brain called ‘grey matter’ – a key component of the central nervous system which is involved in touch and pain sensory perception.
During the study, which involved patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, researchers used recent advances in ground breaking brain imaging and analyses methods to take detailed nerve assessments of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.
This revealed that the volume of certain brain regions in people with diabetic neuropathy was significantly lower compared to those without the disease. Previous studies have shown that the impact of the disease on the brain is limited and isolated to outside areas of the brain considered to be peripheral to core functions in the body.
The breakthrough could pave the way for better assessment and monitoring of the disease, which affects around a third of people with diabetes. This, in turn, could lead to better treatments for sufferers in the future.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Research sheds new light on impact of diabetes on the brain

The new findings published in the Diabetes Care journal reveal the extent of damage patients suffering with the disease can endure in areas of the brain called ‘grey matter’ – a key component of the central nervous system which is involved in touch and pain sensory perception.

During the study, which involved patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, researchers used recent advances in ground breaking brain imaging and analyses methods to take detailed nerve assessments of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.

This revealed that the volume of certain brain regions in people with diabetic neuropathy was significantly lower compared to those without the disease. Previous studies have shown that the impact of the disease on the brain is limited and isolated to outside areas of the brain considered to be peripheral to core functions in the body.

The breakthrough could pave the way for better assessment and monitoring of the disease, which affects around a third of people with diabetes. This, in turn, could lead to better treatments for sufferers in the future.

Read more

Reblogged from yesknopemaybe

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

(Source: yesknopemaybe, via cosmo-nautic)

Reblogged from thecodeinecowboy

thecodeinecowboy:

Notice how if we were to stop arguing about who’s right or wrong we could pretty much change the world.

(via mindaltering)

Reblogged from tiny-creatures
Reblogged from sixpenceee

thecraftychemist:

sagrasa:

sixpenceee:

If you thought the post on twins sharing consciousness was awesome, wait until you hear this.

A 44-year-old French man one day went to the trip to the doctor’s because he felt a pain in his left leg. He’s a married man with two kids and a steady job.

Doctor’s found that he had hydrocephalus as a child (when your brain is filled with fluids) so they decided to run some brain scans.

What they found was that the majority of his head was filled with fluid. Over time, the buildup caused his lateral ventricles to swell so much that his brain had been flattened to a thin sheet.

Doctors estimated that his brain mass had been reduced by at most 70%, affecting the areas in charge of motion, language, emotion, and, well, everything.

Shockingly, he was fine. While his IQ was only 75, he wasn’t mentally challenged. He held a steady job, raised a family, and didn’t have trouble interacting with others.

Over time, his brain had adapted to all that pressure, and even though he had fewer neurons that most, Jacques was still a fully functional human being.

The doctors drained the fluid and while his brain is much smaller now, he is still a healthy individual with a normal life.

SOURCE

If you don’t think neuroplasticity is wicked incredible, you can go away! 

Reblogged from ohscience
ohscience:

Human bone cancer (osteosarcoma) showing actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue) (63x) 
(via Human bone cancer showing actin filaments, mitochondria, and DNA | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

ohscience:

Human bone cancer (osteosarcoma) showing actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue) (63x)
(via Human bone cancer showing actin filaments, mitochondria, and DNA | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Reblogged from jinnigan
So long as I confine my activities to social service and the blind, they compliment me extravagantly, calling me ‘arch priestess of the sightless,’ ‘wonder woman,’ and a ‘modern miracle.’ But when it comes to a discussion of poverty, and I maintain that it is the result of wrong economics—that the industrial system under which we live is at the root of much of the physical deafness and blindness in the world—that is a different matter! It is laudable to give aid to the handicapped. Superficial charities make smooth the way of the prosperous; but to advocate that all human beings should have leisure and comfort, the decencies and refinements of life, is a Utopian dream, and one who seriously contemplates its realization indeed must be deaf, dumb, and blind.

Helen Keller (letter to Senator Robert La Follette, 1924)

funny how the most popular narrative about helen keller is a harmless little girl who learns to communicate and then the story ends for some reason gee i wonder why that is

(via callmeoutis)

(Source: jinnigan, via categorical-imperative)

Reblogged from thatscienceguy

Just A Reminder Of How Small We Are

thatscienceguy:

This is the distribution of mass in the different planets, Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Earth making up just 1%.

image

And this is a distribution of all the mass in the solar system, including the sun - all the planets make up that tiny 0.14% left over after the sun…

image

(via thecraftychemist)

Reblogged from mucholderthen

mucholderthen:

Scientists have for the first time synthesized a chromosome of a eukaryotic cell (in this case, a yeast).

A genetic sequence was designed on a computer, then pieced together and integrated into a living yeast cell to create a semi-artificial life-form. 

Infographic by Karl Tate.  Source:  LiveScience

This is a BIG DEAL!

(via megacosms)

Reblogged from dutchster

dutchster:

when the doorbell rings and i know it’s the pizza guy

image

(via ugly)

Reblogged from silencemadenietzschecry
"Know thyself" is the entire field of knowledge. Only when the human being has finally attained knowledge of all things will he have known himself. For things are merely the boundaries of the human being. Friedrich Nietzsche  (via sisyphean-revolt)

(Source: silencemadenietzschecry, via categorical-imperative)

Reblogged from lostkauaikid

(Source: lostkauaikid, via megacosms)

Reblogged from waandering

(Source: waandering, via mindaltering)