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Reblogged from currentsinbiology
currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems
In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.
While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102
"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."
English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems

In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.

While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102

"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."

English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

(via somuchscience)

Reblogged from wildcat2030
People like to say that we cannot witness evolution because it occurs over timescales immensely greater than our lifetime. That’s incorrect. We can witness evolution all we want, in our lifetime, by watching other things that change and morph freely – for example the evolution of sports, or the evolution of technology. Evolution in technology is the same as the evolution of a biological species. The ‘organism’ in this case is the human-and-machine species. Machines do not happen by themselves; they are created by humans, because of human needs, and it is humans that add the abilities of their creations to their own in order to improve them – to make their bodies move more easily, or more economically, more safely, or further over the earth. More technology tends towards more and better life. Evolution is about facilitating flow, the movement of one thing over or past another. Flow systems, the designs created by this evolutionary process, change freely over time. As such, evolution is a physical phenomenon, not just a biological one. The changing organisational structures that facilitate greater and better flow are physical objects, whether animate or inanimate. Go with the flow and you’ll find evolution belongs to physics (via wildcat2030)

(via wildcat2030)

Reblogged from mindblowingscience
Reblogged from jonathan-deamer
Keep in mind that books don’t just compete against books. Books compete against mobile games, television, movies, Facebook, blogs, free news sites and more. If we want a healthy reading culture, we have to work hard to be sure books actually are competitive against these other media types, and a big part of that is working hard to make books less expensive. Amazon Spells Out Objectives in Hachette Negotiation (via jonathan-deamer)

(via wildcat2030)

Reblogged from wtfevolution
wtfevolution:

Hippos, evolution? Hippos?!

wtfevolution:

Hippos, evolution? Hippos?!

Reblogged from tornadotitans
tornadotitans:

A storm exploding into the sky, with its anvil spreading outwards near Laverne, OK on June 3, 2012.

tornadotitans:

A storm exploding into the sky, with its anvil spreading outwards near Laverne, OK on June 3, 2012.

Reblogged from astronomybird
Reblogged from creatures-alive
Reblogged from biocanvas
corporisfabrica:

biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver
Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.
Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

Their propensity for engulfing debris and pathogens earns macrophages their name, which literally means ‘big eater’

corporisfabrica:

biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver

Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.

Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

Their propensity for engulfing debris and pathogens earns macrophages their name, which literally means ‘big eater

(Source: fei.com)

Reblogged from wildcat2030
Reblogged from wildcat2030
Reblogged from bpod-mrc
bpod-mrc:

29 July 2014
It’s a Wrap
Our nerve endings (axons) rely on a protective outer layer called myelin to insulate their lively signals, a bit like the plastic coating on electrical wires. The little round blobs pictured are microscopic myelin makers, known as oligodendrocytes, migrating towards tiny conical mounds of silicon, each 1000-times smaller than a sand castle. Each mound, or ‘micropillar’, acts like an exposed axon, prompting the oligodendrocytes to transform into stringy myelin-forming cells (top left), which coil protectively around the silicon cones. This is actually a chemical test site – drugs can be flooded in around the micropillars to discover those which encourage myelin growth, their effects measured from above by counting the rings of myelin wrapped around the cones. Finding chemicals which boost myelin growth could help to reverse degenerative nervous diseases like multiple sclerosis, were myelin is worn away leaving nerves fragile and exposed.
Written by John Ankers
—
Adapted from image by Jonah Chan and colleaguesUniversity of California, USACopyright held by Nature Publishing GroupResearch published by Nature Medicine, July 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

29 July 2014

It’s a Wrap

Our nerve endings (axons) rely on a protective outer layer called myelin to insulate their lively signals, a bit like the plastic coating on electrical wires. The little round blobs pictured are microscopic myelin makers, known as oligodendrocytes, migrating towards tiny conical mounds of silicon, each 1000-times smaller than a sand castle. Each mound, or ‘micropillar’, acts like an exposed axon, prompting the oligodendrocytes to transform into stringy myelin-forming cells (top left), which coil protectively around the silicon cones. This is actually a chemical test site – drugs can be flooded in around the micropillars to discover those which encourage myelin growth, their effects measured from above by counting the rings of myelin wrapped around the cones. Finding chemicals which boost myelin growth could help to reverse degenerative nervous diseases like multiple sclerosis, were myelin is worn away leaving nerves fragile and exposed.

Written by John Ankers

Adapted from image by Jonah Chan and colleagues
University of California, USA
Copyright held by Nature Publishing Group
Research published by Nature Medicine, July 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

Reforestation

What is reforestation?

Reforestation involves the replanting or regeneration of areas of forest which have previously been damaged or destroyed. Sometimes forests are able to regenerate naturally if sufficient trees remain nearby and seeds can be dispersed into the deforested areas via animals or wind. However, areas of forest which have been severely degraded are unlikely to be able to regenerate naturally and need to be replanted by hand using native tree species.

Why is reforestation needed?

Reforestation is needed because huge areas of forest are being damaged or destroyed around the world on a daily basis. Some estimates suggest that an area of forest equivalent in size to 36 football pitches is lost every minute. This deforestation has a number of causes, including fires, the clearing of land to make way for agriculture or human settlement, logging, mining and climate change.

Forests are very important for a number of reasons and deforestation is a serious problem which affects us all. As well as being home to a huge and diverse range of animal and plant species, forests provide livelihoods for a vast number of people around the world and are a source of paper, timber, food and the ingredients of many other products, such as medicines and cosmetics. Forests are also vital for the health of our planet, maintaining the water cycle, preventing soil erosion and absorbing and storing enormous amounts of carbon dioxide which helps to limit the effects of climate change.

In order to tackle deforestation there are a number of organisations around the world that aim to replant trees and help to regenerate and restore forest habitats.

Reforestation facts

  • Reforestation usually involves replanting areas of forest which have previously been damaged or destroyed, using native tree species.
  • Reforestation is of great importance, as estimates suggest that at the current rate of deforestation, there may be no rainforest left within 100 years.
  • Huge areas of forest have already been lost, for example, only around eight percent of the Atlantic forest in South America now remains.

read more from ARKive 

Reblogged from sixpenceee

sixpenceee:

The following is a white blood cell chasing a bacterium. It eventually ends up swallowing it. The following white blood cell is specifically a neutrophil. They end up ingesting the microbe a process known as phagocytosis. 

VIDEO

(via somuchscience)

Reblogged from neuromorphogenesis
Has it ever struck you … that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going? It’s really all memory … except for each passing moment. Eric Kandel, “In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind” (via neuromorphogenesis)

(via wakinglithiumflower)